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Archive for March, 2010

I’m very excited to announce that Ryan Paul & THE ARDENT will be playing the Minneapolis ARTCRANK opening on April 10th. In short, ARTCRANK is a community of local cycling artists who create incredible original work surrounding their passions: cycling and the city. The pieces are inexpensive ($30) and quite possibly the coolest thing(s) you can hang on your wall. More info by clicking on the image above.

If you are not a hardcore biker, this event is still for you. It is a total blast! This will be my second year. Free entry. Free food and drink. And a free set by myself & THE ARDENT. We’ll be playing around 10pm, when it is reasonable to get good and loud. Mark your calendar and BE THERE!

*Now, for my personal note about the gig (why does this always happen?)*

I like ARTCRANK a lot. It starts with the fact that I am a cyclist who enjoys using my bike for the majority of my transportation needs. I like the fact that they write the name in all caps. I like sweet art for $30. I love the people who are involved.

If you click on the ARTCRANK website, you’ll notice a list of partners along the left-hand side. I have a few notes on some mentioned (and some not):

There’s this group of people who work underneath a ton of cool events going on throughout the city. They scope the scene, absorb artists and musicians they like, and try to push them to the front of the proverbial “line”. RPandTA got sucked up by this group quite some time ago.

The (not creepy) illuminati-esque  group I speak of is comprised of, but not limited to, Dena Alspach with Metro Magazine, Kate O’Reilly with O’Reilly Creative, and (my bff) elli rader of Paperlily.

O’Reilly Creative & Paperlily teamed up to put on The Jennefit last week. Dena is quite a bit more visible, and took on The Metro 100 Party in 2009. Those are just a few mentions. The group has conspired on quite a few assignments over the course of the last year.

It was elli who put me face-to-face with, ARTCRANK Director and Curator, Charles Youel, at Art-A-Whirl in 2009. From that point on, I have kept up with Charles and have grown quite fond of his daily musings and receptive spirit. It is/was an honor to be asked to perform at this gallery opening. I woulda been there supporting it anyhow!

Please come support ARTCRANK by purchasing some prints or just hanging out! I don’t see any 331 dates on the working calendar, so this may be your last chance to catch RPandTA for free in the coming months.

Just do it, K?
.rp

P.S. I got my copy of the “Cute Souvenirs Sessions” EP that we will be releasing in June. It’s pretty dang good. Get excited.

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I would first like to drop a quick note and say that I loved the jennefit. It was a heck of a time. I was able to take care of a few things that I had been meaning to check off my list for some time now.

The first was to cover a Morrissey/Smiths song. Most who know me (even a little bit), know that I am a Morrissey fanatic. It’s pretty sick, but it could be worse. I have always had a healthy fear of covering Moz’s stuff. However, after some thought on it, I decided that now would be the time. I’m not getting any younger.

The second was to have my old friend Jeremy Ylvisaker on my stage. You see, I had spent a considerable amount of time in my late teens and early 20’s working as a tech for Jeremy and have remained in constant admiration of his guitar playing and catch him whenever possible. When they were throwing together the sets for the jennefit, it was suggested that Jeremy come play with us. I was honored that he said yes.

So, to kill a few birds in one set, here is Jeremy Ylvisaker sitting in with us covering “Death of a Disco Dancer” by The Smiths:

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Coming up on Friday(March 26) of this week is the “Jennefit“. Cute name, right? I’ll spit some specifics and then get into my thoughts on the show. Proceeds from the show will be given to photographer, Jenn Barnett, to buy a new camera so she may begin anew her undeniably indispensable job of documenting the Minneapolis music scene.

When? March 26th, 2010
Where? The Turf Club in St. Paul, MN
Who?

How Much? $10 (advance tix available via Indietickets)

I know Jenn pretty well at this point. It didn’t take me long to develop a relationship with her because she was everywhere I went on a weekend. I think Rebecca Lang from the Star Tribune put it best with: “Minneapolis has its share of photo pit junkies who manage to post galleries of the previous night’s shows on Flickr before the rest of us have had our coffee. One of them (being) Jenn Barnett.”

Music mastermind, Ed Ackerson, said,  “Jenn is golden, a huge asset for our community as a whole.”

I find it so cool that Ed used the word “community“.

We live in a world that is gasping for air in our current economic climate. It seems that every single industry (including the music industry) is asking the same question: how will we survive today? I’ve sat by and watched as dreams of Motley Crüe limousines have turned to aspirations to make rent. Many have argued that the shift has been one that has been good for the industry. In theory, I agree. However, the shift is not as temperate as one would like to believe.

Instead of leveling the income playing field for musicians, this economy simply has those who made more, making a little less. It has those who were making some, making none.

I will acknowledge that our enterprise does not have a measurable imprint on those who are pinched by the recession. We don’t offer goods or services that will keep  roofs over heads or food in the bellies. No matter how much we want to play ourselves off as “artists”, the fact of the matter is that we work in the entertainment industry. When budgets get snug, the first belt-tightening goes around the waist of our craft.

Lately, one hears pep talks and Presidential addresses telling us to “pull together” in order to triumph (or even make it through a fiscal quarter). When I hear phrases like “pull together”, I almost automatically think of a community.

The word “community” has become a bit of a buzz anthem, but I don’t believe the concept has lost all meaning. However, it’s NOT a gathering of a few people who get along reasonably well and have the same ideals. Communities give life to the whole body. A community contains people of all different sizes, races, colors, talents, drives, etc. With all of these differences, the group can work together far better than one alone. I have often dreamed of an artist/musician community, not just here in Minneapolis, but around the world.

It’s easy to mention artist/musician comradeship, but is a bit of a challenge to plan and implement. There are so many steps and not one of them can happen overnight. But I have a few ideas on how to start…

Who am I?
I think the first step to moving into an artist/music community is to know yourself. It’s important to know your own strengths and weaknesses. If someone approached me asking me to play on a punk record, or to sub at a punk show, my immediate response would be to pass it off to a member of the community who specializes in that genre. That may be an easy example, but if I add that this particular punk gig was high paying, then maybe I would have you thinking twice. (I am aware of the irony of this example. There is no such thing as a high paying punk gig.)

My hope with passing on the punk gig would be that if he/she were approached with an indie or alt country opportunity, that it would be passed on to me. The funny thing is that once I became aware of areas where I am lacking, it became easier for me to plug areas where I am effective.

Give first – Take last
It is witnessed over and over again that when an organization like The Red Cross offers relief to an impoverished area, the concern of the starving civilians starts with their neighbors instead of themselves. When a small portion of food is given to a famished and malnourished victim of poverty, the first thing they do is turn around and give the ENTIRE food package to another member of their community. Can we learn something from this?

How about this: In order to join most co-ops, unions, or other social affiliations, one must pay some kind of entry fee. These funds go into a pot that will benefit the entire outfit. Upon paying our ante, we know that for us to succeed, the entire group must succeed. Jerry Greenfield (Ben & Jerry’s) once said “If your support the community, they will support you.” This can/does relate to the musical community.

It has always interested me to watch the ways that musicians support one another. Our greatest tool for giving is our mouths*. In a world of social media, this should also be the easiest way for us to contribute to the overall community. A few months ago I went to see Chris Koza and The Honeydogs. At one point in the show I became overwhelmed by Peter Sieve’s (Chris Koza) guitar playing. My first reaction was to tell everyone I knew via twitter about my appreciation for his playing. My hope was to catch the attention of someone who may not have heard Chris’ music.

In January of 2010, I was given the opportunity to give Metro Magazine my top 5 local and national records of 2009. That was a thrill for me as I am always telling anyone who will listen about my appreciation for some of our talented Minneapolis musicians. Some are friends. Some I have never met. It doesn’t matter.

*I once saw a band finish a set in Brooklyn and were handing flyers out to people after they had torn down their gear. I asked their guitar player if they were plugging friends of theirs. He said, “Never met em. Love their EP though. We printed these at Kinko’s ourselves. You should go.”

Inclusive vs. Exclusive
Last summer, I sat with a musician who has gold records hanging on the wall in his studio. He’s written songs that have won awards I will most likely never touch. He had just gotten off the phone with a talent buyer at a local venue and was (understandably) miffed. The more he processed his frustrations verbally, he said “Do you know that Austin has nearly the same demographic as Minneapolis? They have SXSW. We have Ribfest.”

This musician went on to voice his love for the inclusive music communities all over the USA and being heart-broken by the exclusive scene here in Minneapolis. I wrote him off as being a little dramatic, but started to take notice around the city. He was partly right. We have locked ourselves into our genres and friend groups. We’ll support those who participate in our tiny “labels”, but only if they support us back. Because, on a Saturday night, we’re “in it for ourselves”.

I can’t count the green rooms I have been in where I have seen bands hurriedly thumbing through calendars in publications looking for their “competition” on the evening. Competition? Are you serious?

It doesn’t have to be that way. The Jennefit is a prime example.

Speaking of competition…
If I were to pick out an industry in Minneapolis that is “competitive”, I would easily point at the photographers of our city. Like Rebecca noted (above), there are tons of them at every venue shooting every show. When I was contacted about playing the Jennefit, I was shocked to find that another local photographer, elli rader, was the driving force behind it. In a cut-throat business, elli wants nothing more than for Jenn to get her camera fixed so she can jump back into business and potentially take customers from her. Does that blow your mind? If it doesn’t, you might need to read it again.

Our models…
elli rader is a classic example of “Give first – Take last” as she has spent a great deal of time and energy on the Jennefit. Musicians who are out night after night, paying door covers, and supporting local musicians are good illustrations. Local musicians who walk straight to the “local” section of record shops are the ones who show me how this is done. Artists and musicians, plugging one another, working together, giving first and taking last.

I’d like to claim that I practice all of these principles day in and out, but I don’t. I am still learning and growing. I have good prototypes to follow (people like elli rader). Younger musicians and artists watch all of you who have been creating successfully for years. Don’t think an eye is taken off of you for a second.

If this type of living is something that interests you, get to a show, a record store, or maybe even the Jennefit. And if you hear something you like, tell everyone you know!

Ryan Paul

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Invisible Button St Patrick's Day at Kitty Cat Klub Ryan Paul & THE ARDENT

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with us at the Kitty Cat Klub. It is going to be a bit of an eclectic evening hosted by Invisible Button Entertainment. Joining us will be Painted Saints and Nice Purse.

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http://blogs.citypages.com/gimmenoise/2010/03/flyer_of_the_we_73.php

Flyer of the Week: Ryan Paul and the Ardent

By Andrea Swensson in Flyer of the Week
Wed., Mar. 3 2010 @ 1:20PM

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ryanpaulflyer.jpg
This flyer caught our attention for a couple of reasons: Not only were we intrigued by these wintry, decoupaged birds, but this is one hell of a lineup for a Thursday night. Ryan Paul and the Ardent will be joined by stellar singer-songwriters Luke Redfield, Brad Senne, and Holly Newsom of Zoo Animal.
Thanks Andrea!!

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